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Andy
2017-05-22
Andy
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
1. Lavender
Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache. Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil.  Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants 2. Lemon Verbena Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma. Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers. 3. Mint Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor. Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun. Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants 4. Lemon Balm Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens. Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container. 5. Ginger Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite. Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy. 6. Thyme Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too. Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance. 7. Chamomile Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea. Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9. 8. Jasmine Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea. Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside. 9. Stevia Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics. Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes. 10. Marjoram This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps. It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil. 11. Cilantro Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion. It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11. 12. Rosemary
Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer. Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil. 13. Fennel Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence. Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun. 14. St. John’s wort It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects. It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots. To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this. 15. Sage The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready. It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly. 16. Viola tricolor
Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea. Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9 17. Basil Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath. Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C). 18. Catnip Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea. If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun. 19. Lemon Grass Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden. Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
  1. Lavender  Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache.
  
Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil. 

Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants

2. Lemon Verbena

Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma.

Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers.

3. Mint

Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor.

Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun.

Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants

4. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens.

Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container.

5. Ginger

Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite.

Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy.

6. Thyme

Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too.

Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance.

7. Chamomile

Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea.

Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9.

8. Jasmine

Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea.

Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside.

9. Stevia
Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics.
  
Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes.

10. Marjoram

This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps.

It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil.

11. Cilantro
Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion.

It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11.

12. Rosemary
  Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer.

Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil.

13. Fennel

Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence.

Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun.

14. St. John’s wort

It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects.

It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots.

To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this.

15. Sage

The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready.

It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly.

16. Viola tricolor
  Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea.

Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9

17. Basil

Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath.

Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C).

18. Catnip

Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea.

If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun.

19. Lemon Grass

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden.

Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
  1. Lavender  Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache.
  
Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil. 

Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants

2. Lemon Verbena

Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma.

Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers.

3. Mint

Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor.

Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun.

Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants

4. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens.

Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container.

5. Ginger

Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite.

Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy.

6. Thyme

Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too.

Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance.

7. Chamomile

Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea.

Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9.

8. Jasmine

Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea.

Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside.

9. Stevia
Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics.
  
Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes.

10. Marjoram

This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps.

It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil.

11. Cilantro
Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion.

It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11.

12. Rosemary
  Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer.

Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil.

13. Fennel

Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence.

Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun.

14. St. John’s wort

It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects.

It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots.

To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this.

15. Sage

The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready.

It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly.

16. Viola tricolor
  Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea.

Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9

17. Basil

Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath.

Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C).

18. Catnip

Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea.

If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun.

19. Lemon Grass

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden.

Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
  1. Lavender  Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache.
  
Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil. 

Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants

2. Lemon Verbena

Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma.

Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers.

3. Mint

Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor.

Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun.

Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants

4. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens.

Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container.

5. Ginger

Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite.

Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy.

6. Thyme

Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too.

Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance.

7. Chamomile

Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea.

Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9.

8. Jasmine

Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea.

Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside.

9. Stevia
Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics.
  
Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes.

10. Marjoram

This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps.

It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil.

11. Cilantro
Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion.

It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11.

12. Rosemary
  Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer.

Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil.

13. Fennel

Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence.

Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun.

14. St. John’s wort

It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects.

It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots.

To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this.

15. Sage

The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready.

It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly.

16. Viola tricolor
  Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea.

Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9

17. Basil

Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath.

Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C).

18. Catnip

Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea.

If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun.

19. Lemon Grass

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden.

Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
  1. Lavender  Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache.
  
Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil. 

Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants

2. Lemon Verbena

Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma.

Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers.

3. Mint

Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor.

Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun.

Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants

4. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens.

Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container.

5. Ginger

Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite.

Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy.

6. Thyme

Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too.

Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance.

7. Chamomile

Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea.

Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9.

8. Jasmine

Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea.

Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside.

9. Stevia
Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics.
  
Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes.

10. Marjoram

This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps.

It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil.

11. Cilantro
Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion.

It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11.

12. Rosemary
  Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer.

Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil.

13. Fennel

Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence.

Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun.

14. St. John’s wort

It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects.

It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots.

To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this.

15. Sage

The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready.

It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly.

16. Viola tricolor
  Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea.

Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9

17. Basil

Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath.

Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C).

18. Catnip

Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea.

If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun.

19. Lemon Grass

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden.

Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
See these 19 tea herbs to make a tea herb garden. It is a wonderful accent that can go along with the rest of your garden and brings you the joy of fresh herbs, you can use these herbs to prepare aromatic, healthy and tasty herbal teas of different flavors.
  1. Lavender  Maybe you’ve never thought to make lavender tea but its floral taste is amazing. A delicious cup of herbal tea you can make from lavender flowers that is sweet and fragrant in taste and is perfect for calming your mind, particularly recommended to reduce tension and alleviate headache.
  
Lavender grows well in full sun, in well drained soil. 

Also read : How to Grow Lavender Plants

2. Lemon Verbena

Lemon verbena leaves are used to make tea. Consumption of its tea improves digestion, joint pain and helps in asthma.

Refreshing and sour, this lemon flavored plant is easy to grow. It needs full sun to thrive and doesn’t tolerate severe winters. Below 14 F (-10 C) the plant dies. It’s more suitable for subtropical and tropical climate, although you can grow lemon verbena in cold climate, but in containers.

3. Mint

Mint is a most favorite tea herb and popular among herbal tea lovers, it’s also one of the easiest plants to grow. Mint tea fights with digestive disorders, abdominal pain and stomach cramps. Besides this, it stimulates the appetite, reduces flatulence and is very refreshing in flavor.

Mint is very robust plant and can even get out of hand in the garden if you don’t care to stop it. It grows in moist soil in full to partial sun.

Also read: How to Control Invasive Plants

4. Lemon Balm

Lemon balm plant is closely related to mint, but has a distinct lemon flavor. It gives flavor to herbal teas and ice creams and appears to be a useful fragrant herb in the kitchens.

Lemon balm grows well in dry soil and partial shade. If grown outside it dies in winter but regrow again in spring. Lemon balm spreads vigorously if grown in garden beds so it’s better to grow it in a confined space or in a container.

5. Ginger

Ginger tea is popular, especially in South and East Asia. Its roots and leaves can be used to make tea. Use of ginger tea is praised in ancient Chinese medicines and Ayurveda, it’s an antioxidant and contains antibacterial properties. It cures diseases like cold, flu, nausea and improves digestion and appetite.

Ginger is such an easy to grow and forget it plant that you’ll definitely like to grow. It is hardy in USDA zones 9 – 12 and grows best in filtered sunlight and moist soil in a spot that is less windy.

6. Thyme

Thyme is an effective herbal tea ingredient that calms stomach problems and sore throat. Use its leaves to prepare tea, if there are flowers, add them too.

Thyme grows well in full sun but also tolerate partial sun and is an ideal herb that is very low maintenance.

7. Chamomile

Beautiful daisy like flowers that smells mildly fruity like an apple, chamomile is a useful medicinal tea herb. It’s traditionally used to induce calm and sleep. You can prepare its tea with small white and yellow flowers rather than the leaves. There are two kinds of chamomile (German and Roman), Roman chamomile offers strong flavored tea.

Chamomile likes sandy soil and lots of sun and it needs a lot of water during the summer. It’s hardy under USDA Zones 4 – 9.

8. Jasmine

Jasmine flowers are suitable to make tea, for this you need to pick some fresh flowers. Dry and mix them with green tea, you can also steep them alone to make jasmine tea.

Jasmine vine thrives in full sun and needs a trellis or a support to climb. It’s not suitable for harsh winter climates, so if you want to grow it, grow it in container that can be moved inside.

9. Stevia
Stevia leaves are sweet and can be steeped to make tea. It’s a safe and natural sweetener, used in place of sugar in an infusion and good for diabetics.
  
Stevia grows in USDA Zones 9 to 11, it doesn’t tolerate cold. Still, you can grow it in more colder zones in a pot so that it can be brought inside when winter comes.

10. Marjoram

This culinary herb has a fruity and sour flavor with a hint of mint. Marjoram tea cures various digestion and stomach problems including poor appetite, liver disease, gallstones, intestinal gas, and stomach cramps.

It grows well in full sun but can tolerate light shade, it needs loose and well drained soil.

11. Cilantro
Commonly used for cooking, cilantro is also suitable for tea. Its tea resembles aroma similar to Lady Gray tea. Mix honey in it to soothe the acidity and constipation. It also clears toxins from the body and prevents indigestion.

It grows in both the sun and partial shade and is an ideal herb for pots. Cilantro grows diversely as annual herb in almost any climate, it can be grown under USDA Zones 3 – 11.

12. Rosemary
  Rosemary tea improves digestion, promotes cognitive function and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from heart disease and cancer.

Rosemary plant prefers full sun, light and well drained soil.

13. Fennel

Fennel seeds are used to prepare its tea. Fennel tea is very beneficial for digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, bloating and flatulence.

Fennel grows in USDA zones 4 to 10 in moist and fertile soil in full to partial sun.

14. St. John’s wort

It is a very effective remedy against nervous disorders: insomnia, depression, anxiety etc. However, it also has some side effects.

It grows very easily without special care. It can be grown on the ground or in pots.

To learn how to grow St John’s wort read this.

15. Sage

The antiseptic tonic of sage enables to provide an effective remedy for ailments as varied as: mouth ulcer and sore throat. Sage tea also helps in depression and Alzheimer. Take 1 tablespoon fresh sage leaves and 1 tablespoon dried sage leaves and steep it for 3 – 5 minutes in boiling water. Strain it and mix honey in it for taste. Your sage tea is ready.

It can be grown either in the ground or in pots. If grown in pots it’s important to water sage regularly.

16. Viola tricolor
  Often referred as wild pansy, it’s a common European flower that grows wild as a short lived perennial. Viola tricolor is known for its medicinal properties. It contains flavonoids, saponins, anthocyanins, carotenoids that helps in fighting myriads of human diseases like cancer, various skin diseases, allergies and sore throat. You can use whole plant to make tea.

Also called as heartsease, viola tricolor grows in partial shade in slightly acidic to neutral soil. It’s hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9

17. Basil

Basil especially holy basil or ‘tulsi’ is best to make basil tea, you can also add honey and ginger in it. Other varieties of basil are also used. Basil is stress reliever and if used with honey and ginger it helps in asthma and cough, cold and influenza. Consumption of basil tea lowers the blood sugar level and helps in heart diseases. Basil tea is also a good cure of mouth problems and bad breath.

Holy Basil loves warm exhibition, it’s a tropical plant, hardy in USDA Zones 10, 11 and grows best when temperature stays around 70 – 86 F (20 – 30 C).

18. Catnip

Mildly sedative and calming, catnip tea is excellent treat after an exhausting day. It helps in digestive disorder like diarrhea, relieves headache and insomnia and if you’re going through nicotine withdrawal, it alleviates the stress. Both the leaves and flowers are used to prepare tea.

If you know how to save your catnip plant from cats for your use growing it is easy. It’s hardy in USDA Zones 3 – 8 and prefers well drained soil that is sandy, although catnip grows in variety of soil types. Keep your plant in full to partial sun.

19. Lemon Grass

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is used to make herbal tea, in soups and other dishes. This lemony scented tea herb also repels pests like white flies away from garden.

Grow lemongrass in warm and sunny spot and do regular watering. Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 9 – 11, however if you like to grow it in colder climate you can grow it in a pot and bring that indoors or in a greenhouse in winter.
2
0
Article
Andy
2017-05-22
Andy
Learn how to grow dill in tropics. In warm, tropical climate you require a different approach to grow this herb. Growing dill in containers is also possible, which is given in this educative guide. Dill is an aromatic annual herb grown for its use in various cuisines. It is a wild plant that attracts butterflies and bees and other beneficial insects. Difficulty — Easy Soil pH — slightly acidic to neutral Scientific Name-– Anethum graveolens Growing Habit
Dill is an upright plant that can grow up to 75 cm tall, it has slightly bluish and green colored scented finely cut leaves and mustard colored umbel flowers. Dill grows well in garden beds and vegetable patches. Growing dill in pots and indoors is also possible. You can grow dill at anytime when the temperature is around 50 – 80 F (10 – 27 C). In cooler climates, it is grown in spring, summer and up to fall in warm temperate zones. But if you live in tropics, grow dill in fall and winter. Planting dill Sow seeds 1/4 inches deep on a bright spot that receive morning sun. One thing you should note that dill hates to be transplanted later, so make sure you’ll sow seeds at exact place or in container where you would like to plant them later. Seeds will germinate in between 7 – 21 days. When seedlings are 2 – 3 inches high, thin them to 10 inches apart. Growing dill in Containers
Dill can grow up to 3 feet high, unlike other herbs it has long tap root so it requires deep pot. Choose at least 12 inches deep container that has sufficient drainage. In a single container you can grow 2 -3 plants together. Location Dill, in order to grow healthy and lush, needs a Mediterranean climate. It prefers full sun. You also need to protect the plant from extreme tropical conditions, only then can you grow it successfully. Whether in pots on the balcony, patio or terrace or in the garden, ensure the plant remains on a less windy position, that is sunny. Keep the plant in afternoon shade if temperature rises up. Watering Dill tolerates drought and its flavor increases if it is allowed to be slightly “thirsty”. But in tropics you’ll need to keep the soil relatively moist. Avoid overwatering in any case. Also Read: How to Make Balcony Herb Garden Soil It can tolerate poor soil, but in fertile soil rich tasting dill is produced. Amend the soil by mixing plenty of aged manure or compost and sand, if needed. Fertilizer Generally, dill does not require frequent fertilizer but to give boost to plant you can feed 5-10-5 fertilizer lightly. If you’re growing dill in containers fertilize the plant every month with half strength liquid fertilizer. Mulching Cover the plant with a 2-inch layer of organic mulch once the plants are 4 inches high. Mulch gives plant stability, suppresses weeds and keeps the soil moist. Pinching and Deadheading Pinch the plant when it grows above 6 inches tall for bushier growth. Nip off the tips regularly. Do not allow the plant to flower and seed, if you want a longer growing period. Harvest Harvest the leaves when the plant is 6 inches high. Once dill brings to flower, it will stop growing leaves, so if you want to keep harvesting the leaves, pinch flower buds when they are small. If you want seeds, stop deadheading. To harvest the seeds, cut the seed heads once they have turned brown.
Learn how to grow dill in tropics. In warm, tropical climate you require a different approach to grow this herb. Growing dill in containers is also possible, which is given in this educative guide.

Dill is an aromatic annual herb grown for its use in various cuisines. It is a wild plant that attracts butterflies and bees and other beneficial insects.

Difficulty — Easy
  
Soil pH — slightly acidic to neutral

Scientific Name-– Anethum graveolens

Growing Habit
  Dill is an upright plant that can grow up to 75 cm tall, it has slightly bluish and green colored scented finely cut leaves and mustard colored umbel flowers. Dill grows well in garden beds and vegetable patches. Growing dill in pots and indoors is also possible.

You can grow dill at anytime when the temperature is around 50 – 80 F (10 – 27 C). In cooler climates, it is grown in spring, summer and up to fall in warm temperate zones. But if you live in tropics, grow dill in fall and winter.

Planting dill

Sow seeds 1/4 inches deep on a bright spot that receive morning sun. One thing you should note that dill hates to be transplanted later, so make sure you’ll sow seeds at exact place or in container where you would like to plant them later. Seeds will germinate in between 7 – 21 days. When seedlings are 2 – 3 inches high, thin them to 10 inches apart.

Growing dill in Containers  Dill can grow up to 3 feet high, unlike other herbs it has long tap root so it requires deep pot. Choose at least 12 inches deep container that has sufficient drainage. In a single container you can grow 2 -3 plants together.

Location

Dill, in order to grow healthy and lush, needs a Mediterranean climate. It prefers full sun. You also need to protect the plant from extreme tropical conditions, only then can you grow it successfully. Whether in pots on the balcony, patio or terrace or in the garden, ensure the plant remains on a less windy position, that is sunny. Keep the plant in afternoon shade if temperature rises up.

Watering

Dill tolerates drought and its flavor increases if it is allowed to be slightly “thirsty”. But in tropics you’ll need to keep the soil relatively moist. Avoid overwatering in any case.

Also Read: How to Make Balcony Herb Garden
  
Soil

It can tolerate poor soil, but in fertile soil rich tasting dill is produced. Amend the soil by mixing plenty of aged manure or compost and sand, if needed.

Fertilizer

Generally, dill does not require frequent fertilizer but to give boost to plant you can feed 5-10-5 fertilizer lightly. If you’re growing dill in containers fertilize the plant every month with half strength liquid fertilizer.

Mulching

Cover the plant with a 2-inch layer of organic mulch once the plants are 4 inches high. Mulch gives plant stability, suppresses weeds and keeps the soil moist.

Pinching and Deadheading

Pinch the plant when it grows above 6 inches tall for bushier growth. Nip off the tips regularly. Do not allow the plant to flower and seed, if you want a longer growing period.

Harvest

Harvest the leaves when the plant is 6 inches high. Once dill brings to flower, it will stop growing leaves, so if you want to keep harvesting the leaves, pinch flower buds when they are small. If you want seeds, stop deadheading. To harvest the seeds, cut the seed heads once they have turned brown.
Learn how to grow dill in tropics. In warm, tropical climate you require a different approach to grow this herb. Growing dill in containers is also possible, which is given in this educative guide.

Dill is an aromatic annual herb grown for its use in various cuisines. It is a wild plant that attracts butterflies and bees and other beneficial insects.

Difficulty — Easy
  
Soil pH — slightly acidic to neutral

Scientific Name-– Anethum graveolens

Growing Habit
  Dill is an upright plant that can grow up to 75 cm tall, it has slightly bluish and green colored scented finely cut leaves and mustard colored umbel flowers. Dill grows well in garden beds and vegetable patches. Growing dill in pots and indoors is also possible.

You can grow dill at anytime when the temperature is around 50 – 80 F (10 – 27 C). In cooler climates, it is grown in spring, summer and up to fall in warm temperate zones. But if you live in tropics, grow dill in fall and winter.

Planting dill

Sow seeds 1/4 inches deep on a bright spot that receive morning sun. One thing you should note that dill hates to be transplanted later, so make sure you’ll sow seeds at exact place or in container where you would like to plant them later. Seeds will germinate in between 7 – 21 days. When seedlings are 2 – 3 inches high, thin them to 10 inches apart.

Growing dill in Containers  Dill can grow up to 3 feet high, unlike other herbs it has long tap root so it requires deep pot. Choose at least 12 inches deep container that has sufficient drainage. In a single container you can grow 2 -3 plants together.

Location

Dill, in order to grow healthy and lush, needs a Mediterranean climate. It prefers full sun. You also need to protect the plant from extreme tropical conditions, only then can you grow it successfully. Whether in pots on the balcony, patio or terrace or in the garden, ensure the plant remains on a less windy position, that is sunny. Keep the plant in afternoon shade if temperature rises up.

Watering

Dill tolerates drought and its flavor increases if it is allowed to be slightly “thirsty”. But in tropics you’ll need to keep the soil relatively moist. Avoid overwatering in any case.

Also Read: How to Make Balcony Herb Garden
  
Soil

It can tolerate poor soil, but in fertile soil rich tasting dill is produced. Amend the soil by mixing plenty of aged manure or compost and sand, if needed.

Fertilizer

Generally, dill does not require frequent fertilizer but to give boost to plant you can feed 5-10-5 fertilizer lightly. If you’re growing dill in containers fertilize the plant every month with half strength liquid fertilizer.

Mulching

Cover the plant with a 2-inch layer of organic mulch once the plants are 4 inches high. Mulch gives plant stability, suppresses weeds and keeps the soil moist.

Pinching and Deadheading

Pinch the plant when it grows above 6 inches tall for bushier growth. Nip off the tips regularly. Do not allow the plant to flower and seed, if you want a longer growing period.

Harvest

Harvest the leaves when the plant is 6 inches high. Once dill brings to flower, it will stop growing leaves, so if you want to keep harvesting the leaves, pinch flower buds when they are small. If you want seeds, stop deadheading. To harvest the seeds, cut the seed heads once they have turned brown.
Learn how to grow dill in tropics. In warm, tropical climate you require a different approach to grow this herb. Growing dill in containers is also possible, which is given in this educative guide.

Dill is an aromatic annual herb grown for its use in various cuisines. It is a wild plant that attracts butterflies and bees and other beneficial insects.

Difficulty — Easy
  
Soil pH — slightly acidic to neutral

Scientific Name-– Anethum graveolens

Growing Habit
  Dill is an upright plant that can grow up to 75 cm tall, it has slightly bluish and green colored scented finely cut leaves and mustard colored umbel flowers. Dill grows well in garden beds and vegetable patches. Growing dill in pots and indoors is also possible.

You can grow dill at anytime when the temperature is around 50 – 80 F (10 – 27 C). In cooler climates, it is grown in spring, summer and up to fall in warm temperate zones. But if you live in tropics, grow dill in fall and winter.

Planting dill

Sow seeds 1/4 inches deep on a bright spot that receive morning sun. One thing you should note that dill hates to be transplanted later, so make sure you’ll sow seeds at exact place or in container where you would like to plant them later. Seeds will germinate in between 7 – 21 days. When seedlings are 2 – 3 inches high, thin them to 10 inches apart.

Growing dill in Containers  Dill can grow up to 3 feet high, unlike other herbs it has long tap root so it requires deep pot. Choose at least 12 inches deep container that has sufficient drainage. In a single container you can grow 2 -3 plants together.

Location

Dill, in order to grow healthy and lush, needs a Mediterranean climate. It prefers full sun. You also need to protect the plant from extreme tropical conditions, only then can you grow it successfully. Whether in pots on the balcony, patio or terrace or in the garden, ensure the plant remains on a less windy position, that is sunny. Keep the plant in afternoon shade if temperature rises up.

Watering

Dill tolerates drought and its flavor increases if it is allowed to be slightly “thirsty”. But in tropics you’ll need to keep the soil relatively moist. Avoid overwatering in any case.

Also Read: How to Make Balcony Herb Garden
  
Soil

It can tolerate poor soil, but in fertile soil rich tasting dill is produced. Amend the soil by mixing plenty of aged manure or compost and sand, if needed.

Fertilizer

Generally, dill does not require frequent fertilizer but to give boost to plant you can feed 5-10-5 fertilizer lightly. If you’re growing dill in containers fertilize the plant every month with half strength liquid fertilizer.

Mulching

Cover the plant with a 2-inch layer of organic mulch once the plants are 4 inches high. Mulch gives plant stability, suppresses weeds and keeps the soil moist.

Pinching and Deadheading

Pinch the plant when it grows above 6 inches tall for bushier growth. Nip off the tips regularly. Do not allow the plant to flower and seed, if you want a longer growing period.

Harvest

Harvest the leaves when the plant is 6 inches high. Once dill brings to flower, it will stop growing leaves, so if you want to keep harvesting the leaves, pinch flower buds when they are small. If you want seeds, stop deadheading. To harvest the seeds, cut the seed heads once they have turned brown.
0
0
Article
Andy
2017-05-22
Andy

Learn how to grow lemongrass from seed in this short tutorial. Growing lemongrass from seed is easy and requires little to no care, once established. Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grows wild in wet grasslands and open forests throughout Southeast Asia, where it is widely used as a culinary herb and medicine. Lemon grass grows up to a height of 1 – 5 meters and have mounding growth habit. Growing lemongrass from seeds is easy and requires little to no care, once established. However, the plants must be kept in warm and humid conditions in the first few weeks after germination. How to Grow Lemongrass from SeedsFill a seed tray with a moistened mixture of equal parts compost, cocopeat or coconut fiber fine and abrasive. Smooth the surface and compress it 1/2 to 1 centimeter of space that remains between the ground and the top of the tray.Sow lemongrass seeds 1 inches apart and 1/4 inches deep. Squeeze the soil mixture over the tops of the seeds.Mist the lemon grass seeds with water from a spray bottle. Spray on the soil surface until it feels moderately moist.Stretch plastic wrap over the seed tray, and seal the edges. Set the tray on a windowsill receiving good light.Remove the plastic wrap once a week to water the lemongrass seeds. Mist the surface of soil until the top 1/2 to 1 inch is damp.Look for germination in about 10 – 30 days. Remove the plastic wrap once the lemongrass seeds grow up to 1 inch in height.Tips for Growing Lemongrass from seedsMist lemongrass periodically as it develops to maintain adequate moisture and humidity around the plants.Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 12 and can be grown anytime. But in cooler season, best time for growing lemongrass from seeds is when temperature start to stay around 70 F.Growing lemongrass from cuttings is easier than growing lemongrass from seeds.  
  Learn how to grow lemongrass from seed in this short tutorial. Growing lemongrass from seed is easy and requires little to no care, once established.

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grows wild in wet grasslands and open forests throughout Southeast Asia, where it is widely used as a culinary herb and medicine. Lemon grass grows up to a height of 1 – 5 meters and have mounding growth habit. Growing lemongrass from seeds is easy and requires little to no care, once established. However, the plants must be kept in warm and humid conditions in the first few weeks after germination.

How to Grow Lemongrass from SeedsFill a seed tray with a moistened mixture of equal parts compost, cocopeat or coconut fiber fine and abrasive. Smooth the surface and compress it 1/2 to 1 centimeter of space that remains between the ground and the top of the tray.Sow lemongrass seeds 1 inches apart and 1/4 inches deep. Squeeze the soil mixture over the tops of the seeds.Mist the lemon grass seeds with water from a spray bottle. 

Spray on the soil surface until it feels moderately moist.Stretch plastic wrap over the seed tray, and seal the edges. Set the tray on a windowsill receiving good light.Remove the plastic wrap once a week to water the lemongrass seeds. Mist the surface of soil until the top 1/2 to 1 inch is damp.Look for germination in about 10 – 30 days. Remove the plastic wrap once the lemongrass seeds grow up to 1 inch in height.Tips for Growing Lemongrass from seedsMist lemongrass periodically as it develops to maintain adequate moisture and humidity around the plants.Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 12 and can be grown anytime. But in cooler season, best time for growing lemongrass from seeds is when temperature start to stay around 70 F.Growing lemongrass from cuttings is easier than growing lemongrass from seeds.
 
  Learn how to grow lemongrass from seed in this short tutorial. Growing lemongrass from seed is easy and requires little to no care, once established.

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grows wild in wet grasslands and open forests throughout Southeast Asia, where it is widely used as a culinary herb and medicine. Lemon grass grows up to a height of 1 – 5 meters and have mounding growth habit. Growing lemongrass from seeds is easy and requires little to no care, once established. However, the plants must be kept in warm and humid conditions in the first few weeks after germination.

How to Grow Lemongrass from SeedsFill a seed tray with a moistened mixture of equal parts compost, cocopeat or coconut fiber fine and abrasive. Smooth the surface and compress it 1/2 to 1 centimeter of space that remains between the ground and the top of the tray.Sow lemongrass seeds 1 inches apart and 1/4 inches deep. Squeeze the soil mixture over the tops of the seeds.Mist the lemon grass seeds with water from a spray bottle. 

Spray on the soil surface until it feels moderately moist.Stretch plastic wrap over the seed tray, and seal the edges. Set the tray on a windowsill receiving good light.Remove the plastic wrap once a week to water the lemongrass seeds. Mist the surface of soil until the top 1/2 to 1 inch is damp.Look for germination in about 10 – 30 days. Remove the plastic wrap once the lemongrass seeds grow up to 1 inch in height.Tips for Growing Lemongrass from seedsMist lemongrass periodically as it develops to maintain adequate moisture and humidity around the plants.Lemongrass is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 12 and can be grown anytime. But in cooler season, best time for growing lemongrass from seeds is when temperature start to stay around 70 F.Growing lemongrass from cuttings is easier than growing lemongrass from seeds.
 
0
0
Article
Andy
2017-03-13
Andy
Learn how to make a windowsill herb garden, if you’re short of space. Pleasure of harvesting your own herbs is immense– you can make fresh tea, use them in salads and garnish them on food.You don’t need a big yard for this, just a small and simple windowsill that receives a few hours of sunlight.
It’s easy and anyone who have lack of space can create a mini herb garden that grows on a window sill. Here are 6 basic steps to follow to make it possible.How to Make a Windowsill Herb Garden 1. Choose Suitable Container to Make a Windowsill Herb Garden Either use lot of pots to grow specific herb in each one or choose a planter as wide as that it’ll cover the space of your windowsill easily, make sure the pot you use should be at least 6 to 12 inches deep. Herbs are shallow root plants so they don’t mind growing in less deep planters. But most of the herbs like mint and thyme have tendency to spread, so it’s good to select a large and wide pot for them. One more benefit of choosing a large pot is that you can pour lot of soil in it and this will save you from frequent watering. 2. Ensure sufficient drainage Once you select a container or containers, second step is to ensure good drainage. Check out the bottom of planter for drainage holes, if they are not sufficient, make some. You don’t need to put gravels or clay balls to make a drainage layer. This is a myth and doesn’t do any good for drainage. 3. Provide quality Potting soil Soil or growing medium for growing herbs should be of best quality. It have to be light, penetrable, fertile and airy. Buy soil less potting mix or make your own by adding perlite, compost and garden soil, it is the best growing medium for containers and essential for the success of your windowsill herb garden. An aerated and rich soil with good retention power of the water improves the quality of plants you grow. 4. Planting a Windowsill Herb Garden Be realistic and don’t try to grow all the aromatic and tastiest herbs you’ve heard about. Make a list of herbs you would like to plant, and find out those which matches your growing conditions. Forget about the species and varieties that are difficult to grow and spread more. Choose basil, rosemary, thyme, oregano, cilantro and sage if your window is exposed to at least 6 hours of direct sun. If exposure of sun is less than this, prefer parsley, lemon balm, fennel, chives, chervil and mint. These are the all time favorite herbs and easiest to grow, if you want to grow something out of the box, do some research. 5. Windowsill Herb Garden Care Water your plants frequently in summer, in fall and winter limit the watering needs. You can also add hydrogel crystals in soil and do heavy mulching to preserve water if you live in tropical climate. To improve the quality and quantity of your crop, it is essential to use fertilizer regularly. Prefer organic fertilizers that provide all the necessary nutrients while being more environmentally friendly. You’ll need nitrogen rich fertilizers to promote more foliage growth in herbs. 6. Harvesting The best way to encourage the production of foliage and dense growth is to harvest herbs regularly, this frequent pinching and picking up of leaves promotes lush and healthy growth of plants. You’ll also need to deadhead flowers to stop the herbs from seeding to prolong their growing time. In addition, to add some colors on your windowsill herb garden, you can plant annual flowers that require similar growing conditions to grow.
Learn how to make a windowsill herb garden, if you’re short of space. Pleasure of harvesting your own herbs is immense– you can make fresh tea, use them in salads and garnish them on food.You don’t need a big yard for this, just a small and simple windowsill that receives a few hours of sunlight.
  It’s easy and anyone who have lack of space can create a mini herb garden that grows on a window sill. Here are 6 basic steps to follow to make it possible.How to 
Make a Windowsill Herb Garden

1. Choose Suitable Container to Make a Windowsill Herb Garden
Either use lot of pots to grow specific herb in each one or choose a planter as wide as that it’ll cover the space of your windowsill easily, make sure the pot you use should be at least 6 to 12 inches deep. Herbs are shallow root plants so they don’t mind growing in less deep planters. But most of the herbs like mint and thyme have tendency to spread, so it’s good to select a large and wide pot for them.

One more benefit of choosing a large pot is that you can pour lot of soil in it and this will save you from frequent watering.
  
2. Ensure sufficient drainage
Once you select a container or containers, second step is to ensure good drainage. Check out the bottom of planter for drainage holes, if they are not sufficient, make some.
You don’t need to put gravels or clay balls to make a drainage layer. This is a myth and doesn’t do any good for drainage.

3. Provide quality Potting soil
Soil or growing medium for growing herbs should be of best quality. It have to be light, penetrable, fertile and airy.
Buy soil less potting mix or make your own by adding perlite, compost and garden soil, it is the best growing medium for containers and essential for the success of your windowsill herb garden.
  
  
An aerated and rich soil with good retention power of the water improves the quality of plants you grow.

4. Planting a Windowsill Herb Garden
Be realistic and don’t try to grow all the aromatic and tastiest herbs you’ve heard about.
Make a list of herbs you would like to plant, and find out those which matches your growing conditions.
Forget about the species and varieties that are difficult to grow and spread more.

Choose basil, rosemary, thyme, oregano, cilantro and sage if your window is exposed to at least 6 hours of direct sun. If exposure of sun is less than this, prefer parsley, lemon balm, fennel, chives, chervil and mint.
These are the all time favorite herbs and easiest to grow, if you want to grow something out of the box, do some research.
5. Windowsill Herb Garden Care
Water your plants frequently in summer, in fall and winter limit the watering needs.
You can also add hydrogel crystals in soil and do heavy mulching to preserve water if you live in tropical climate.

To improve the quality and quantity of your crop, it is essential to use fertilizer regularly. Prefer organic fertilizers that provide all the necessary nutrients while being more environmentally friendly.
You’ll need nitrogen rich fertilizers to promote more foliage growth in herbs.
6. Harvesting
The best way to encourage the production of foliage and dense growth is to harvest herbs regularly, this frequent pinching and picking up of leaves promotes lush and healthy growth of plants.
You’ll also need to deadhead flowers to stop the herbs from seeding to prolong their growing time.

In addition, to add some colors on your windowsill herb garden, you can plant annual flowers that require similar growing conditions to grow.
Learn how to make a windowsill herb garden, if you’re short of space. Pleasure of harvesting your own herbs is immense– you can make fresh tea, use them in salads and garnish them on food.You don’t need a big yard for this, just a small and simple windowsill that receives a few hours of sunlight.
  It’s easy and anyone who have lack of space can create a mini herb garden that grows on a window sill. Here are 6 basic steps to follow to make it possible.How to 
Make a Windowsill Herb Garden

1. Choose Suitable Container to Make a Windowsill Herb Garden
Either use lot of pots to grow specific herb in each one or choose a planter as wide as that it’ll cover the space of your windowsill easily, make sure the pot you use should be at least 6 to 12 inches deep. Herbs are shallow root plants so they don’t mind growing in less deep planters. But most of the herbs like mint and thyme have tendency to spread, so it’s good to select a large and wide pot for them.

One more benefit of choosing a large pot is that you can pour lot of soil in it and this will save you from frequent watering.
  
2. Ensure sufficient drainage
Once you select a container or containers, second step is to ensure good drainage. Check out the bottom of planter for drainage holes, if they are not sufficient, make some.
You don’t need to put gravels or clay balls to make a drainage layer. This is a myth and doesn’t do any good for drainage.

3. Provide quality Potting soil
Soil or growing medium for growing herbs should be of best quality. It have to be light, penetrable, fertile and airy.
Buy soil less potting mix or make your own by adding perlite, compost and garden soil, it is the best growing medium for containers and essential for the success of your windowsill herb garden.
  
  
An aerated and rich soil with good retention power of the water improves the quality of plants you grow.

4. Planting a Windowsill Herb Garden
Be realistic and don’t try to grow all the aromatic and tastiest herbs you’ve heard about.
Make a list of herbs you would like to plant, and find out those which matches your growing conditions.
Forget about the species and varieties that are difficult to grow and spread more.

Choose basil, rosemary, thyme, oregano, cilantro and sage if your window is exposed to at least 6 hours of direct sun. If exposure of sun is less than this, prefer parsley, lemon balm, fennel, chives, chervil and mint.
These are the all time favorite herbs and easiest to grow, if you want to grow something out of the box, do some research.
5. Windowsill Herb Garden Care
Water your plants frequently in summer, in fall and winter limit the watering needs.
You can also add hydrogel crystals in soil and do heavy mulching to preserve water if you live in tropical climate.

To improve the quality and quantity of your crop, it is essential to use fertilizer regularly. Prefer organic fertilizers that provide all the necessary nutrients while being more environmentally friendly.
You’ll need nitrogen rich fertilizers to promote more foliage growth in herbs.
6. Harvesting
The best way to encourage the production of foliage and dense growth is to harvest herbs regularly, this frequent pinching and picking up of leaves promotes lush and healthy growth of plants.
You’ll also need to deadhead flowers to stop the herbs from seeding to prolong their growing time.

In addition, to add some colors on your windowsill herb garden, you can plant annual flowers that require similar growing conditions to grow.
2
0
Article
Andy
2017-03-13
Andy
Learn how to grow licorice (Mulethi) in this article if you love to grow medicinal herbs. Growing licorice and licorice plant care is easy.
The licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which means sweet root in Greek is actually a legume. It is native to the Mediterranean and parts of the South-West Asia and particularly to the Indian subcontinent, where it is called ‘Mulethi’ It is a perennial herb that grows to over a meter and a half tall. It is cultivated for its roots, the plant has an extensive root system. Roots grow 3 to 4 feet (1 – 1.2 m) deep and can extend to 25 feet (10 m) in a deep, permeable soil. Growing licorice in container is also possible. Licorice Uses Roots of this shrub are the part that usually consumed. Licorice roots, besides having a sweet anise like flavor are also beneficial to health with medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and expectorant effect. It is used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and greek medicines too. Learn more about Licorice uses USDA Zones— 6 – 11 Difficulty— Easy Other Names— Acide Glycyrrhizique, Acide Glycyrrhizinique, Alcacuz, Alcazuz, Bois Doux, Bois Sucré, Can Cao, Chinese Licorice, Deglycyrrhized Licorice, Gan Cao, Gan Zao, Glabra, Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza glabra typica, Glycyrrhiza glabra violacea, Glycyrrhiza glabra glandulifera, Glycyrrhiza Radix, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Glycyrrhizae, Glycyrrhizic Acid, Glycyrrhizinic Acid, Isoflavone, Jethi-Madh, Kanzo, Lakritze, Licorice Root, Liquiritiae Radix, Liquirizia, Mulathi, Mulethi, Orozuz, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-œstrogène, Racine de Réglisse, Racine Douce, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Régalissse, Regaliz, Reglisse, Réglisse, Réglisse Déglycyrrhisée, Réglisse Espagnole, Réglisse Russe, Regliz, Russian Licorice, Spanish Licorice, Subholz, Sussholz, Sweet Root, Yashtimadhu, Yashti-Madhu, Yashti-Madhuka, Zhi Gan Cao, liquorice. How to Grow LicoricePropagation Propagating licorice is easy. It can be propagated from cuttings, division or seeds. Growing Licorice from seeds Soak the seeds for at least 24 hours in lukewarm water and then sow seeds in seed starting mix, which you can make yourself from these seed mix recipes. Sow the seeds at a depth of 1/2 inch. Cover the seeds with soil and keep it evenly moist until the seeds germinate. Germination occurs within two weeks. Optimum germination ranges around 68 F (20 C). Leave space of 2 feet between each plant. Growing Licorice from Divison Divide the licorice plant in spring or fall. Every division must have about one growth bud. If are dividing the plant in the fall (autumn), divisions must be replanted immediately or you can also store them in clamps for spring planting. Planting Licorice should be planted in the spring or summer. In warm subtropical or tropical climate growing licorice is possible year around except peak summer. How to Grow Licorice on the Ground Plant licorice on the ground in any land loosened deep, well-draining soil, devoid of stones. Dig a pit that is 60 cm wide and 50 cm deep and then backfill it with the soil. If the soil is clay rich lighten it by adding compost and sand. How to Grow Licorice in Pot Choose a large pot (at least 20 cm) of a light color so that the temperature does not rise too much for the roots. Make a mixture of 1 parts sand 1 part compost and 1 part loam. In colder zones keep the pot indoors during winter. Requirements for Growing Licorice
Position This shrub needs to be in a location that is sunny to grow properly but if you’re growing licorice in tropics, plant it in on a location that receives shade in the afternoon. Soil A soil that is light and rich in humus facilitates the harvesting of the roots and maintains moisture. It prefers slightly sandy soil that is well draining but retains moisture with neutral to slightly alkaline pH levels. Watering Growing licorice requires regular and abundant watering during the growing period. Regular and deep watering is required to keep the soil slightly moist all the time. In winter, watering should be reduced. Licorice Plant Care Licorice plant care is simple, you just need to be careful about a few basic needs. This herbaceous perennial is mildly frost tolerant can bear temperature down to 5 F (-15 C) Mulching Mulch is required to retain the moisture in the soil. Fertilizer Licorice doesn’t need fertilizer. Although, if the soil is poor, mix compost at the time of planting or mulch around the base of plant with compost. Temperature It prefers average temperature around 60 – 85 F (15 to 30 C). Frost, high winds or too warm temperature can damage the plant. Pests and Diseases It usually remains pests and diseases free. Spider mites may invade the foliage, particularly in dry summers. Spraying the foliage with water helps to prevent them. Powdery mildew, slugs, and caterpillars can be a problem too. Harvesting Licorice Licorice roots are ready for harvest after two years of planting. Harvest the plant in fall. Extract the horizontal roots with a sharp spade and replant the plant so that it will regrow again. Preserve the main roots so as not to damage the plant. Storage Once dried, the licorice roots can be kept for several months. Companion Plants for Licorice Good companions — Marjoram, rosemary, and marigold.
Learn how to grow licorice (Mulethi) in this article if you love to grow medicinal herbs. Growing licorice and licorice plant care is easy.
  The licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which means sweet root in Greek is actually a legume. It is native to the Mediterranean and parts of the South-West Asia and particularly to the Indian subcontinent, where it is called ‘Mulethi’ It is a perennial herb that grows to over a meter and a half tall. It is cultivated for its roots, the plant has an extensive root system. Roots grow 3 to 4 feet (1 – 1.2 m) deep and can extend to 25 feet (10 m) in a deep, permeable soil. Growing licorice in container is also possible.
  
Licorice Uses
Roots of this shrub are the part that usually consumed. Licorice roots, besides having a sweet anise like flavor are also beneficial to health with medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and expectorant effect. It is used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and greek medicines too.

Learn more about Licorice uses

USDA Zones— 6 – 11

Difficulty— Easy

Other Names— Acide Glycyrrhizique, Acide Glycyrrhizinique, Alcacuz, Alcazuz, Bois Doux, Bois Sucré, Can Cao, Chinese Licorice, Deglycyrrhized Licorice, Gan Cao, Gan Zao, Glabra, Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza glabra typica, Glycyrrhiza glabra violacea, Glycyrrhiza glabra glandulifera, Glycyrrhiza Radix, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Glycyrrhizae, Glycyrrhizic Acid, Glycyrrhizinic Acid, Isoflavone, Jethi-Madh, Kanzo, Lakritze, Licorice Root, Liquiritiae Radix, Liquirizia, Mulathi, Mulethi, Orozuz, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-œstrogène, Racine de Réglisse, Racine Douce, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Régalissse, Regaliz, Reglisse, Réglisse, Réglisse Déglycyrrhisée, Réglisse Espagnole, Réglisse Russe, Regliz, Russian Licorice, Spanish Licorice, Subholz, Sussholz, Sweet Root, Yashtimadhu, Yashti-Madhu, Yashti-Madhuka, Zhi Gan Cao, liquorice.
How to Grow LicoricePropagation
Propagating licorice is easy. It can be propagated from cuttings, division or seeds.
Growing Licorice from seeds
Soak the seeds for at least 24 hours in lukewarm water and then sow seeds in seed starting mix, which you can make yourself from these seed mix recipes. Sow the seeds at a depth of 1/2 inch. Cover the seeds with soil and keep it evenly moist until the seeds germinate. Germination occurs within two weeks. Optimum germination ranges around 68 F (20 C). Leave space of 2 feet between each plant.
  
Growing Licorice from Divison
Divide the licorice plant in spring or fall. Every division must have about one growth bud. If are dividing the plant in the fall (autumn), divisions must be replanted immediately or you can also store them in clamps for spring planting.

Planting
Licorice should be planted in the spring or summer. In warm subtropical or tropical climate growing licorice is possible year around except peak summer.
How to Grow Licorice on the Ground
Plant licorice on the ground in any land loosened deep, well-draining soil, devoid of stones.
Dig a pit that is 60 cm wide and 50 cm deep and then backfill it with the soil. If the soil is clay rich lighten it by adding compost and sand.
How to Grow Licorice in Pot
Choose a large pot (at least 20 cm) of a light color so that the temperature does not rise too much for the roots. Make a mixture of 1 parts sand 1 part compost and 1 part loam. In colder zones keep the pot indoors during winter.
Requirements for Growing Licorice  Position
This shrub needs to be in a location that is sunny to grow properly but if you’re growing licorice in tropics, plant it in on a location that receives shade in the afternoon.

Soil
A soil that is light and rich in humus facilitates the harvesting of the roots and maintains moisture. It prefers slightly sandy soil that is well draining but retains moisture with neutral to slightly alkaline pH levels.

Watering
Growing licorice requires regular and abundant watering during the growing period. Regular and deep watering is required to keep the soil slightly moist all the time. In winter, watering should be reduced.

Licorice Plant Care
Licorice plant care is simple, you just need to be careful about a few basic needs. This herbaceous perennial is mildly frost tolerant can bear temperature down to 5 F (-15 C)

Mulching
Mulch is required to retain the moisture in the soil.

Fertilizer
Licorice doesn’t need fertilizer. Although, if the soil is poor, mix compost at the time of planting or mulch around the base of plant with compost.

Temperature
It prefers average temperature around 60 – 85 F (15 to 30 C). Frost, high winds or too warm temperature can damage the plant.

Pests and Diseases
It usually remains pests and diseases free. Spider mites may invade the foliage, particularly in dry summers. Spraying the foliage with water helps to prevent them. Powdery mildew, slugs, and caterpillars can be a problem too.

Harvesting Licorice
Licorice roots are ready for harvest after two years of planting. Harvest the plant in fall. Extract the horizontal roots with a sharp spade and replant the plant so that it will regrow again. Preserve the main roots so as not to damage the plant.

Storage
Once dried, the licorice roots can be kept for several months.
Companion Plants for Licorice
Good companions — Marjoram, rosemary, and marigold.
Learn how to grow licorice (Mulethi) in this article if you love to grow medicinal herbs. Growing licorice and licorice plant care is easy.
  The licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which means sweet root in Greek is actually a legume. It is native to the Mediterranean and parts of the South-West Asia and particularly to the Indian subcontinent, where it is called ‘Mulethi’ It is a perennial herb that grows to over a meter and a half tall. It is cultivated for its roots, the plant has an extensive root system. Roots grow 3 to 4 feet (1 – 1.2 m) deep and can extend to 25 feet (10 m) in a deep, permeable soil. Growing licorice in container is also possible.
  
Licorice Uses
Roots of this shrub are the part that usually consumed. Licorice roots, besides having a sweet anise like flavor are also beneficial to health with medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and expectorant effect. It is used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and greek medicines too.

Learn more about Licorice uses

USDA Zones— 6 – 11

Difficulty— Easy

Other Names— Acide Glycyrrhizique, Acide Glycyrrhizinique, Alcacuz, Alcazuz, Bois Doux, Bois Sucré, Can Cao, Chinese Licorice, Deglycyrrhized Licorice, Gan Cao, Gan Zao, Glabra, Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza glabra typica, Glycyrrhiza glabra violacea, Glycyrrhiza glabra glandulifera, Glycyrrhiza Radix, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Glycyrrhizae, Glycyrrhizic Acid, Glycyrrhizinic Acid, Isoflavone, Jethi-Madh, Kanzo, Lakritze, Licorice Root, Liquiritiae Radix, Liquirizia, Mulathi, Mulethi, Orozuz, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-œstrogène, Racine de Réglisse, Racine Douce, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Régalissse, Regaliz, Reglisse, Réglisse, Réglisse Déglycyrrhisée, Réglisse Espagnole, Réglisse Russe, Regliz, Russian Licorice, Spanish Licorice, Subholz, Sussholz, Sweet Root, Yashtimadhu, Yashti-Madhu, Yashti-Madhuka, Zhi Gan Cao, liquorice.
How to Grow LicoricePropagation
Propagating licorice is easy. It can be propagated from cuttings, division or seeds.
Growing Licorice from seeds
Soak the seeds for at least 24 hours in lukewarm water and then sow seeds in seed starting mix, which you can make yourself from these seed mix recipes. Sow the seeds at a depth of 1/2 inch. Cover the seeds with soil and keep it evenly moist until the seeds germinate. Germination occurs within two weeks. Optimum germination ranges around 68 F (20 C). Leave space of 2 feet between each plant.
  
Growing Licorice from Divison
Divide the licorice plant in spring or fall. Every division must have about one growth bud. If are dividing the plant in the fall (autumn), divisions must be replanted immediately or you can also store them in clamps for spring planting.

Planting
Licorice should be planted in the spring or summer. In warm subtropical or tropical climate growing licorice is possible year around except peak summer.
How to Grow Licorice on the Ground
Plant licorice on the ground in any land loosened deep, well-draining soil, devoid of stones.
Dig a pit that is 60 cm wide and 50 cm deep and then backfill it with the soil. If the soil is clay rich lighten it by adding compost and sand.
How to Grow Licorice in Pot
Choose a large pot (at least 20 cm) of a light color so that the temperature does not rise too much for the roots. Make a mixture of 1 parts sand 1 part compost and 1 part loam. In colder zones keep the pot indoors during winter.
Requirements for Growing Licorice  Position
This shrub needs to be in a location that is sunny to grow properly but if you’re growing licorice in tropics, plant it in on a location that receives shade in the afternoon.

Soil
A soil that is light and rich in humus facilitates the harvesting of the roots and maintains moisture. It prefers slightly sandy soil that is well draining but retains moisture with neutral to slightly alkaline pH levels.

Watering
Growing licorice requires regular and abundant watering during the growing period. Regular and deep watering is required to keep the soil slightly moist all the time. In winter, watering should be reduced.

Licorice Plant Care
Licorice plant care is simple, you just need to be careful about a few basic needs. This herbaceous perennial is mildly frost tolerant can bear temperature down to 5 F (-15 C)

Mulching
Mulch is required to retain the moisture in the soil.

Fertilizer
Licorice doesn’t need fertilizer. Although, if the soil is poor, mix compost at the time of planting or mulch around the base of plant with compost.

Temperature
It prefers average temperature around 60 – 85 F (15 to 30 C). Frost, high winds or too warm temperature can damage the plant.

Pests and Diseases
It usually remains pests and diseases free. Spider mites may invade the foliage, particularly in dry summers. Spraying the foliage with water helps to prevent them. Powdery mildew, slugs, and caterpillars can be a problem too.

Harvesting Licorice
Licorice roots are ready for harvest after two years of planting. Harvest the plant in fall. Extract the horizontal roots with a sharp spade and replant the plant so that it will regrow again. Preserve the main roots so as not to damage the plant.

Storage
Once dried, the licorice roots can be kept for several months.
Companion Plants for Licorice
Good companions — Marjoram, rosemary, and marigold.
Learn how to grow licorice (Mulethi) in this article if you love to grow medicinal herbs. Growing licorice and licorice plant care is easy.
  The licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which means sweet root in Greek is actually a legume. It is native to the Mediterranean and parts of the South-West Asia and particularly to the Indian subcontinent, where it is called ‘Mulethi’ It is a perennial herb that grows to over a meter and a half tall. It is cultivated for its roots, the plant has an extensive root system. Roots grow 3 to 4 feet (1 – 1.2 m) deep and can extend to 25 feet (10 m) in a deep, permeable soil. Growing licorice in container is also possible.
  
Licorice Uses
Roots of this shrub are the part that usually consumed. Licorice roots, besides having a sweet anise like flavor are also beneficial to health with medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and expectorant effect. It is used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and greek medicines too.

Learn more about Licorice uses

USDA Zones— 6 – 11

Difficulty— Easy

Other Names— Acide Glycyrrhizique, Acide Glycyrrhizinique, Alcacuz, Alcazuz, Bois Doux, Bois Sucré, Can Cao, Chinese Licorice, Deglycyrrhized Licorice, Gan Cao, Gan Zao, Glabra, Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza glabra typica, Glycyrrhiza glabra violacea, Glycyrrhiza glabra glandulifera, Glycyrrhiza Radix, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Glycyrrhizae, Glycyrrhizic Acid, Glycyrrhizinic Acid, Isoflavone, Jethi-Madh, Kanzo, Lakritze, Licorice Root, Liquiritiae Radix, Liquirizia, Mulathi, Mulethi, Orozuz, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-œstrogène, Racine de Réglisse, Racine Douce, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Régalissse, Regaliz, Reglisse, Réglisse, Réglisse Déglycyrrhisée, Réglisse Espagnole, Réglisse Russe, Regliz, Russian Licorice, Spanish Licorice, Subholz, Sussholz, Sweet Root, Yashtimadhu, Yashti-Madhu, Yashti-Madhuka, Zhi Gan Cao, liquorice.
How to Grow LicoricePropagation
Propagating licorice is easy. It can be propagated from cuttings, division or seeds.
Growing Licorice from seeds
Soak the seeds for at least 24 hours in lukewarm water and then sow seeds in seed starting mix, which you can make yourself from these seed mix recipes. Sow the seeds at a depth of 1/2 inch. Cover the seeds with soil and keep it evenly moist until the seeds germinate. Germination occurs within two weeks. Optimum germination ranges around 68 F (20 C). Leave space of 2 feet between each plant.
  
Growing Licorice from Divison
Divide the licorice plant in spring or fall. Every division must have about one growth bud. If are dividing the plant in the fall (autumn), divisions must be replanted immediately or you can also store them in clamps for spring planting.

Planting
Licorice should be planted in the spring or summer. In warm subtropical or tropical climate growing licorice is possible year around except peak summer.
How to Grow Licorice on the Ground
Plant licorice on the ground in any land loosened deep, well-draining soil, devoid of stones.
Dig a pit that is 60 cm wide and 50 cm deep and then backfill it with the soil. If the soil is clay rich lighten it by adding compost and sand.
How to Grow Licorice in Pot
Choose a large pot (at least 20 cm) of a light color so that the temperature does not rise too much for the roots. Make a mixture of 1 parts sand 1 part compost and 1 part loam. In colder zones keep the pot indoors during winter.
Requirements for Growing Licorice  Position
This shrub needs to be in a location that is sunny to grow properly but if you’re growing licorice in tropics, plant it in on a location that receives shade in the afternoon.

Soil
A soil that is light and rich in humus facilitates the harvesting of the roots and maintains moisture. It prefers slightly sandy soil that is well draining but retains moisture with neutral to slightly alkaline pH levels.

Watering
Growing licorice requires regular and abundant watering during the growing period. Regular and deep watering is required to keep the soil slightly moist all the time. In winter, watering should be reduced.

Licorice Plant Care
Licorice plant care is simple, you just need to be careful about a few basic needs. This herbaceous perennial is mildly frost tolerant can bear temperature down to 5 F (-15 C)

Mulching
Mulch is required to retain the moisture in the soil.

Fertilizer
Licorice doesn’t need fertilizer. Although, if the soil is poor, mix compost at the time of planting or mulch around the base of plant with compost.

Temperature
It prefers average temperature around 60 – 85 F (15 to 30 C). Frost, high winds or too warm temperature can damage the plant.

Pests and Diseases
It usually remains pests and diseases free. Spider mites may invade the foliage, particularly in dry summers. Spraying the foliage with water helps to prevent them. Powdery mildew, slugs, and caterpillars can be a problem too.

Harvesting Licorice
Licorice roots are ready for harvest after two years of planting. Harvest the plant in fall. Extract the horizontal roots with a sharp spade and replant the plant so that it will regrow again. Preserve the main roots so as not to damage the plant.

Storage
Once dried, the licorice roots can be kept for several months.
Companion Plants for Licorice
Good companions — Marjoram, rosemary, and marigold.
0
0
Article
Andy
2017-02-24
Andy
Learn how to #grow feverfew. Growing feverfew plant is relatively easy. It is a useful medicinal herb, plus it embellishes itself with beautiful yellow-white #flowers .
Difficulty — Easy Other Names — Featherfew, Fever few, Febrifuge #plant , Featherfoil, Mid-summer daisy and wild chamomile . Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) belong to the Asteraceae family (family of chrysanthemums). This plant is also called “false chamomile”. It is native to the Eastern Mediterranean. From there it was brought to Central and Western Europe a long time ago, where it was grown in gardens as a medicinal and ornamental plant. In temperate areas, the feverfew is a short living perennial. Where the winters are harder, growing feverfew is possible as an annual plant. It is a low maintenance plant that loves to grow in typically variety of soil types and therefore frequently occurs as a garden weed. Feverfew Uses Feverfew is used to treat a wide range of health problems, such as fever, cold, rheumatism and cramps. It is also widely used to treat migraines. The flowers, stems and leaves are harvested for medicinal purposes. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is considered the main biological active ingredient found in feverfew. How to Grow FeverfewPropagation and Planting Feverfew It can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and division. To propagate it from seeds, since they are somewhat rare if you don’t find them locally, buy online. Sow them indoors in early spring in a seed tray using well draining starting mix. Scatter the seeds over the surface of soil and lightly tamp them. Cover the tray with plastic sheet or put in a plastic bag and keep that in a bright spot. If you want to sow seeds directly on the ground wait until the temperature warms up around 60 F (15 C) and last frost date passes away in the spring. Keep the soil evenly moist until the germination. Germination occurs within one or two weeks after seed sowing. To know more about feverfew propagation, read this article. Requirements for Growing FeverfewLocation Often this herb settles down by itself in the garden and is regarded by many gardeners wrongly as a weed. Ideal location to grow feverfew is full to partially sunny spot. Growing feverfew in pots, railing planters and window boxes is possible too, you can easily cultivate it on your balcony garden, just be careful not to keep it on windy spot. Watering Feverfew plants prefer soil which never dry out completely. Regular watering is important but overwatering can lead it to death, care in watering is required in cold weather conditions, in winter. Soil This undemanding plant grows in all soil types except heavy clay rich soil. Best to plant it in nutrient-rich, well drained and loose soil. Feverfew Plant CareFertilizer Growing feverfew doesn’t require fertilizer, if soil is rich in organic matter. However, you can apply a fertilizer you use for other flowers monthly. Overwinter Feverfew plants are grown as perennial and annual. Annual varieties die off in the winter and then germinate again in the spring. Feverfews are sensitive to extreme cold and need special care in winter time. Mulching Do protect mulching to protect the plant from severe cold in winters. Mulching also helps in summers in conserving moisture. Pruning Deadhead the faded flowers and slightly prune off the plant after the first flowering. Pruning stimulates the growth of new flowers. Prune long, leggy and diseased branches with discolored leaves. You can prune off the plant up to about one-third of its size. Pests and diseases While growing feverfew plants, gardeners sometimes face problems due to wrong planting site and permanent waterlogging in soil. In pests and diseases, care feverfew plant from slugs, powdery mildew, spider mites and aphids. To prevent the pests, colonize geraniums, garlics or cress as companion plants. Harvesting
Learn how to  #grow   feverfew. Growing feverfew plant is relatively easy. It is a useful medicinal herb, plus it embellishes itself with beautiful yellow-white  #flowers  .
  Difficulty — Easy
  
Other Names — Featherfew, Fever few, Febrifuge  #plant  , Featherfoil, Mid-summer daisy and wild chamomile .

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) belong to the Asteraceae family (family of chrysanthemums). This plant is also called “false chamomile”. It is native to the Eastern Mediterranean. From there it was brought to Central and Western Europe a long time ago, where it was grown in gardens as a medicinal and ornamental plant.

In temperate areas, the feverfew is a short living perennial. Where the winters are harder, growing feverfew is possible as an annual plant. It is a low maintenance plant that loves to grow in typically variety of soil types and therefore frequently occurs as a garden weed.
Feverfew Uses
Feverfew is used to treat a wide range of health problems, such as fever, cold, rheumatism and cramps. It is also widely used to treat migraines. The flowers, stems and leaves are harvested for medicinal purposes. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is considered the main biological active ingredient found in feverfew.
How to Grow FeverfewPropagation and Planting Feverfew
It can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and division.
  
To propagate it from seeds, since they are somewhat rare if you don’t find them locally, buy online. Sow them indoors in early spring in a seed tray using well draining starting mix. Scatter the seeds over the surface of soil and lightly tamp them. Cover the tray with plastic sheet or put in a plastic bag and keep that in a bright spot.

If you want to sow seeds directly on the ground wait until the temperature warms up around 60 F (15 C) and last frost date passes away in the spring. Keep the soil evenly moist until the germination. Germination occurs within one or two weeks after seed sowing.

To know more about feverfew propagation, read this article.
Requirements for Growing FeverfewLocation
Often this herb settles down by itself in the garden and is regarded by many gardeners wrongly as a weed. Ideal location to grow feverfew is full to partially sunny spot. Growing feverfew in pots, railing planters and window boxes is possible too, you can easily cultivate it on your balcony garden, just be careful not to keep it on windy spot.

Watering

Feverfew plants prefer soil which never dry out completely. Regular watering is important but overwatering can lead it to death, care in watering is required in cold weather conditions, in winter.
Soil

This undemanding plant grows in all soil types except heavy clay rich soil. Best to plant it in nutrient-rich, well drained and loose soil.
Feverfew Plant CareFertilizer

Growing feverfew doesn’t require fertilizer, if soil is rich in organic matter. However, you can apply a fertilizer you use for other flowers monthly.
Overwinter

Feverfew plants are grown as perennial and annual. Annual varieties die off in the winter and then germinate again in the spring. Feverfews are sensitive to extreme cold and need special care in winter time.
Mulching

Do protect mulching to protect the plant from severe cold in winters. Mulching also helps in summers in conserving moisture.
Pruning

Deadhead the faded flowers and slightly prune off the plant after the first flowering. Pruning stimulates the growth of new flowers. Prune long, leggy and diseased 
branches with discolored leaves. You can prune off the plant up to about one-third of its size.

Pests and diseases

While growing feverfew plants, gardeners sometimes face problems due to wrong planting site and permanent waterlogging in soil. In pests and diseases, care feverfew plant from slugs, powdery mildew, spider mites and aphids. To prevent the pests, colonize geraniums, garlics or cress as companion plants.
Harvesting
Learn how to  #grow   feverfew. Growing feverfew plant is relatively easy. It is a useful medicinal herb, plus it embellishes itself with beautiful yellow-white  #flowers  .
  Difficulty — Easy
  
Other Names — Featherfew, Fever few, Febrifuge  #plant  , Featherfoil, Mid-summer daisy and wild chamomile .

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) belong to the Asteraceae family (family of chrysanthemums). This plant is also called “false chamomile”. It is native to the Eastern Mediterranean. From there it was brought to Central and Western Europe a long time ago, where it was grown in gardens as a medicinal and ornamental plant.

In temperate areas, the feverfew is a short living perennial. Where the winters are harder, growing feverfew is possible as an annual plant. It is a low maintenance plant that loves to grow in typically variety of soil types and therefore frequently occurs as a garden weed.
Feverfew Uses
Feverfew is used to treat a wide range of health problems, such as fever, cold, rheumatism and cramps. It is also widely used to treat migraines. The flowers, stems and leaves are harvested for medicinal purposes. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is considered the main biological active ingredient found in feverfew.
How to Grow FeverfewPropagation and Planting Feverfew
It can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and division.
  
To propagate it from seeds, since they are somewhat rare if you don’t find them locally, buy online. Sow them indoors in early spring in a seed tray using well draining starting mix. Scatter the seeds over the surface of soil and lightly tamp them. Cover the tray with plastic sheet or put in a plastic bag and keep that in a bright spot.

If you want to sow seeds directly on the ground wait until the temperature warms up around 60 F (15 C) and last frost date passes away in the spring. Keep the soil evenly moist until the germination. Germination occurs within one or two weeks after seed sowing.

To know more about feverfew propagation, read this article.
Requirements for Growing FeverfewLocation
Often this herb settles down by itself in the garden and is regarded by many gardeners wrongly as a weed. Ideal location to grow feverfew is full to partially sunny spot. Growing feverfew in pots, railing planters and window boxes is possible too, you can easily cultivate it on your balcony garden, just be careful not to keep it on windy spot.

Watering

Feverfew plants prefer soil which never dry out completely. Regular watering is important but overwatering can lead it to death, care in watering is required in cold weather conditions, in winter.
Soil

This undemanding plant grows in all soil types except heavy clay rich soil. Best to plant it in nutrient-rich, well drained and loose soil.
Feverfew Plant CareFertilizer

Growing feverfew doesn’t require fertilizer, if soil is rich in organic matter. However, you can apply a fertilizer you use for other flowers monthly.
Overwinter

Feverfew plants are grown as perennial and annual. Annual varieties die off in the winter and then germinate again in the spring. Feverfews are sensitive to extreme cold and need special care in winter time.
Mulching

Do protect mulching to protect the plant from severe cold in winters. Mulching also helps in summers in conserving moisture.
Pruning

Deadhead the faded flowers and slightly prune off the plant after the first flowering. Pruning stimulates the growth of new flowers. Prune long, leggy and diseased 
branches with discolored leaves. You can prune off the plant up to about one-third of its size.

Pests and diseases

While growing feverfew plants, gardeners sometimes face problems due to wrong planting site and permanent waterlogging in soil. In pests and diseases, care feverfew plant from slugs, powdery mildew, spider mites and aphids. To prevent the pests, colonize geraniums, garlics or cress as companion plants.
Harvesting
Learn how to  #grow   feverfew. Growing feverfew plant is relatively easy. It is a useful medicinal herb, plus it embellishes itself with beautiful yellow-white  #flowers  .
  Difficulty — Easy
  
Other Names — Featherfew, Fever few, Febrifuge  #plant  , Featherfoil, Mid-summer daisy and wild chamomile .

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) belong to the Asteraceae family (family of chrysanthemums). This plant is also called “false chamomile”. It is native to the Eastern Mediterranean. From there it was brought to Central and Western Europe a long time ago, where it was grown in gardens as a medicinal and ornamental plant.

In temperate areas, the feverfew is a short living perennial. Where the winters are harder, growing feverfew is possible as an annual plant. It is a low maintenance plant that loves to grow in typically variety of soil types and therefore frequently occurs as a garden weed.
Feverfew Uses
Feverfew is used to treat a wide range of health problems, such as fever, cold, rheumatism and cramps. It is also widely used to treat migraines. The flowers, stems and leaves are harvested for medicinal purposes. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is considered the main biological active ingredient found in feverfew.
How to Grow FeverfewPropagation and Planting Feverfew
It can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and division.
  
To propagate it from seeds, since they are somewhat rare if you don’t find them locally, buy online. Sow them indoors in early spring in a seed tray using well draining starting mix. Scatter the seeds over the surface of soil and lightly tamp them. Cover the tray with plastic sheet or put in a plastic bag and keep that in a bright spot.

If you want to sow seeds directly on the ground wait until the temperature warms up around 60 F (15 C) and last frost date passes away in the spring. Keep the soil evenly moist until the germination. Germination occurs within one or two weeks after seed sowing.

To know more about feverfew propagation, read this article.
Requirements for Growing FeverfewLocation
Often this herb settles down by itself in the garden and is regarded by many gardeners wrongly as a weed. Ideal location to grow feverfew is full to partially sunny spot. Growing feverfew in pots, railing planters and window boxes is possible too, you can easily cultivate it on your balcony garden, just be careful not to keep it on windy spot.

Watering

Feverfew plants prefer soil which never dry out completely. Regular watering is important but overwatering can lead it to death, care in watering is required in cold weather conditions, in winter.
Soil

This undemanding plant grows in all soil types except heavy clay rich soil. Best to plant it in nutrient-rich, well drained and loose soil.
Feverfew Plant CareFertilizer

Growing feverfew doesn’t require fertilizer, if soil is rich in organic matter. However, you can apply a fertilizer you use for other flowers monthly.
Overwinter

Feverfew plants are grown as perennial and annual. Annual varieties die off in the winter and then germinate again in the spring. Feverfews are sensitive to extreme cold and need special care in winter time.
Mulching

Do protect mulching to protect the plant from severe cold in winters. Mulching also helps in summers in conserving moisture.
Pruning

Deadhead the faded flowers and slightly prune off the plant after the first flowering. Pruning stimulates the growth of new flowers. Prune long, leggy and diseased 
branches with discolored leaves. You can prune off the plant up to about one-third of its size.

Pests and diseases

While growing feverfew plants, gardeners sometimes face problems due to wrong planting site and permanent waterlogging in soil. In pests and diseases, care feverfew plant from slugs, powdery mildew, spider mites and aphids. To prevent the pests, colonize geraniums, garlics or cress as companion plants.
Harvesting
Learn how to  #grow   feverfew. Growing feverfew plant is relatively easy. It is a useful medicinal herb, plus it embellishes itself with beautiful yellow-white  #flowers  .
  Difficulty — Easy
  
Other Names — Featherfew, Fever few, Febrifuge  #plant  , Featherfoil, Mid-summer daisy and wild chamomile .

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) belong to the Asteraceae family (family of chrysanthemums). This plant is also called “false chamomile”. It is native to the Eastern Mediterranean. From there it was brought to Central and Western Europe a long time ago, where it was grown in gardens as a medicinal and ornamental plant.

In temperate areas, the feverfew is a short living perennial. Where the winters are harder, growing feverfew is possible as an annual plant. It is a low maintenance plant that loves to grow in typically variety of soil types and therefore frequently occurs as a garden weed.
Feverfew Uses
Feverfew is used to treat a wide range of health problems, such as fever, cold, rheumatism and cramps. It is also widely used to treat migraines. The flowers, stems and leaves are harvested for medicinal purposes. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone is considered the main biological active ingredient found in feverfew.
How to Grow FeverfewPropagation and Planting Feverfew
It can be propagated by seeds, cuttings and division.
  
To propagate it from seeds, since they are somewhat rare if you don’t find them locally, buy online. Sow them indoors in early spring in a seed tray using well draining starting mix. Scatter the seeds over the surface of soil and lightly tamp them. Cover the tray with plastic sheet or put in a plastic bag and keep that in a bright spot.

If you want to sow seeds directly on the ground wait until the temperature warms up around 60 F (15 C) and last frost date passes away in the spring. Keep the soil evenly moist until the germination. Germination occurs within one or two weeks after seed sowing.

To know more about feverfew propagation, read this article.
Requirements for Growing FeverfewLocation
Often this herb settles down by itself in the garden and is regarded by many gardeners wrongly as a weed. Ideal location to grow feverfew is full to partially sunny spot. Growing feverfew in pots, railing planters and window boxes is possible too, you can easily cultivate it on your balcony garden, just be careful not to keep it on windy spot.

Watering

Feverfew plants prefer soil which never dry out completely. Regular watering is important but overwatering can lead it to death, care in watering is required in cold weather conditions, in winter.
Soil

This undemanding plant grows in all soil types except heavy clay rich soil. Best to plant it in nutrient-rich, well drained and loose soil.
Feverfew Plant CareFertilizer

Growing feverfew doesn’t require fertilizer, if soil is rich in organic matter. However, you can apply a fertilizer you use for other flowers monthly.
Overwinter

Feverfew plants are grown as perennial and annual. Annual varieties die off in the winter and then germinate again in the spring. Feverfews are sensitive to extreme cold and need special care in winter time.
Mulching

Do protect mulching to protect the plant from severe cold in winters. Mulching also helps in summers in conserving moisture.
Pruning

Deadhead the faded flowers and slightly prune off the plant after the first flowering. Pruning stimulates the growth of new flowers. Prune long, leggy and diseased 
branches with discolored leaves. You can prune off the plant up to about one-third of its size.

Pests and diseases

While growing feverfew plants, gardeners sometimes face problems due to wrong planting site and permanent waterlogging in soil. In pests and diseases, care feverfew plant from slugs, powdery mildew, spider mites and aphids. To prevent the pests, colonize geraniums, garlics or cress as companion plants.
Harvesting
0
0
Article
Andy
2017-02-15
Andy
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun 1. Lemongrass
This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container. 2. Mint
In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun. 3. Parsley
Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden. 4. Chives
Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division. 5. Garden Cress
You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights. 6. Catnip
Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered. 7. Lemon Balm
Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry. 8. Chervil
Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions. Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry. 9. Cilantro
Image Credit: Gardening Know How Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window. 10. Sage
Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it. 11. Thyme
Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible. A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
Starting an indoor herb garden? Find out 11 best herbs to grow indoors. These are easiest to grow and require less care.
  Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in Less Sun

1. Lemongrass
  This herb grows wild in tropics and becomes easiest indoor herb, you can also grow it in temperate climates. It requires slightly moist soil and partial sun, and it can even adjust itself in a small container.
  
 2. Mint
  In the garden, mint becomes very invasive and grows like a weed. It doesn’t require plenty of sun too. You can even keep your potted mint plant in a spot that receives bright indirect sun.

3. Parsley
  Germinate parsley from seeds, seedlings may sprout up late, sometimes in a month. But once grown, parsley requires minimal attention. Grow it in a medium-large pot and keep that in a spot that receives part sun. In a moderate room temperature, you can grow it year round. Just propagate new plants time to time from cuttings and it will last forever in your indoor herb garden.

4. Chives
  Herbs that require less sunlight and moist soil in order to thrive are most suitable for growing indoors. Chives doesn’t require a sunny spot. Just place the pot near a bright window facing east. You can multiply chives from an already established plant by division.

5. Garden Cress
  You can grow this cool season annual indoors easily. Plant seeds in a shallow but wide containers and keep the pot on a windowsill that receives partial sun. Soil should be moist, for regular harvest of cress micro greens, plant seeds in interval of every two weeks. You can cut and harvest the garden cress 3-4 times. If there is no sun, you can grow it under fluorescent lamps and T5 fluorescent plant lights.

6. Catnip
  Growing catnip indoors is hard if you have cats. Apart from that, it is one of the easiest herbs. Once you germinate seeds, you can grow it forever from cuttings. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and keep it well watered.

7. Lemon Balm
  Lemon balm grows year round in warmer zones. Some gardeners even consider it a weed. Growing lemon balm indoors is super easy if you can provide it an exposure to 4 hours of sunlight daily. When growing indoors, water the plant only when top soil is dry.

8. Chervil
  Chervil is one of the herbs you can grow indoors smoothly. A room temperature around 60-70 F is optimum for it. It can also adapt to low light conditions.
Best Herbs to Grow Indoors in More Sun9. Dill
  The secret of growing dill successfully in a container is to grow it in a deep one. A minimum 10 inches deep container is required. For growing dill indoors keep it in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily, provide good air circulation and water it only when top 1 inch surface of potting soil seems dry.

9. Cilantro
  Image Credit: Gardening Know How
Cilantro is extremely easy to germinate but hard to maintain in containers. The trick is to grow cilantro in a deep container. It bolts quickly so it is better to plant seeds time to time. Keep cilantro in the south or west facing window.

10. Sage
  Grow sage indoors only if you have a South or West facing window that receives plenty of sun. This perennial herb takes a lot of time to get established when grown from seeds so it is better to take a tip cutting and propagate it.

11. Thyme
  Thyme can adjust itself to partial sun and if you can provide 5 hours of sunlight daily, growing thyme indoors is possible.
A few more herbs you can grow indoors on a sunny windowsillOreganoRosemaryTarragonBasil
1
0
Article
Andy
2017-02-15
Andy
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips. We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house? Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden. Apartment Herb Garden Tips 1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start. Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds. 2. Evaluate well the available space
Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there. 3. Go vertical to create space
Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea. 4. Grow more than just herbs
If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables. 5. Provide shade in the hottest months
Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun. 6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit. Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden 7. Get enough place to store herbs
With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
Start apartment gardening if you live in a city and don’t have space for a regular garden with these 7 apartment herb garden tips.
We all try to be as healthy and natural as possible. We go to grocery stores, organic markets and spend money on superfoods. We purify our drinking water, pay attention to our body and try occasionally to enjoy nature to come out of our hectic schedules. A herb garden fits perfectly into this picture. Your home-grown herbs and perhaps vegetables too. Who does not want that? Freshest and tastiest. But of course, there is still a practical side to this story. How to create a herb garden? Did you have space for a garden in your urban house?

Maybe not, but you can create a small garden anywhere. In your apartment balcony, on a small terrace, patio or on a rooftop you can create a herb garden.
  
Apartment Herb Garden Tips
1. Choose herbs that you like and use most
  Gardening with herbs is easiest. A good start is half the work. Carefully think about what you want exactly. A herb garden (or any kind of garden) takes time, money and energy so it’s good to know what you need before you start.

Do you eat a lot of basil, parsley, cilantro or even thyme or rosemary? If you’re not so sure what you’re using exactly and frequently wait for a couple of weeks and keep a small diary or save your observation in a message or email draft and see what often gets into your food, which herb is essential in your food culture and which one you would like to try. Once you get the answers, go ahead to buy herbs for a herb garden or start them from seeds.

2. Evaluate well the available space
  Next, it is important that you choose a good place for your herb garden. That is of course entirely dependent on the available space. In a limited space like a windowsill you should probably do this with a few pots. It would be better if you have a balcony or roof terrace, you are all set and if you have a garden, the possibilities are quite endless. What you should think, especially if you need to work in a small space, is that how much sunlight you get there.

3. Go vertical to create space
  Go vertical to create space. Use walls, railings and ceiling to hang planters. If you think smartly you can increase your space up to 3-4 times this way. You can hang shelves too where you can put small pots. Another attractive solution to make a pallet shelve or use a shoe rack. If you’re growing herbs indoors buying a herb garden set is also a good idea.

4. Grow more than just herbs
  If there is space left grow more than just herbs. Beautiful annual flowers, foliage plants or long-lasting perennials. A lemon tree or a dwarf fruit tree. The possibilities are endless. You can also start to grow your ow vegetables.

5. Provide shade in the hottest months
  Plants love sunlight. But as with everything in moderation is very important. If your place receives day long excessive sunshine provides a little afternoon shade, especially in warm climates. Too much sun can dry the herbs and die, herbs like cilantro bolts in warm temperature in the scorching sun.

6. Create a nice seating area in your herb garden
  Your herb garden will also look very nice and the fragrance of aromatic herbs will make it a wonderful place to sit in. If you have grown some flowers and shrubs you can enjoy it more. So it’s a good idea to create a nice place to sit.

Also Read: How to Make a Balcony Herb Garden

7. Get enough place to store herbs
  With these apartment herb garden tips and some dedication, the time will come when the herbs are ready to be picked. You can pick off fresh fragrant leaves to garnish on your dishes or you can store some for later use. Of course, it depends entirely on how much you have sown this will decide how much you will have to reap. It is nice to keep the dried herbs in the kitchen so that you can use them during cooking conveniently.
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